The Open Book

The Lee & Low/Tu Books Tumblr

158 notes

There are so many writers of color out there, and often what they get when they bring their books to their editors, they say, ‘We don’t relate to the character.’ Well it’s not for you to relate to! And why can’t you expand yourself so you can relate to the humanity of a character as opposed to the color of what they are?
Anika Noni Rose in Vanity Fair, via this excellent Buzzfeed article on diversity in publishing.

Filed under diversity gap diversity in publishing white privilege writers of color Diversity Now

185 notes

More TV viewers were drawn to shows with ethnically diverse casts and writers, while shows with less diversity in their credits attracted smaller audiences.

The new report documents a similar phenomenon in film: Those with a relatively high amount of minority involvement (21–30 percent) on screen posted the highest median global box office receipts ($160.1 million). In contrast, films with the least minority involvement (10 percent or less) posted much lower box office receipts ($68.5 million).
A new study out of UCLA proves that diversity sells in Hollywood, despite myths to the contrary. 

Filed under diversity in Hollywood hollywood diversity gap ucla diversity onscreen

4,327 notes

You do not have to be good.
You do not have to walk on your knees
for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
You only have to let the soft animal of your body
love what it loves.
Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
Meanwhile the world goes on.
Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
are moving across the landscapes,
over the prairies and the deep trees,
the mountains and the rivers.
Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
are heading home again.
Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
the world offers itself to your imagination,
calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting-
over and over announcing your place
In the family of things.

"Wild Geese," Mary Oliver (via commanderspock)

Happy National Poetry Month!

(Source: commovente, via breakthebricks)

Filed under national poetry month mary oliver poetry

2,530 notes

theflightofthephoenix:

justinaireland:

rosalarian:

When I say people want to see more diversity in stories, no, I really don’t mean different stories about straight white dudes. I really, really don’t mean that at all. This isn’t about types of stories being told. This is specifically about people. I’m not letting you make this about something else. You are not hijacking this message to make sure we’re still talking about straight white dudes.

You, sirs, are part of the problem. *stink eye*

LOVE THIS!

Filed under diversity diversity gap kidlit diversity in books

100 notes

The question industry professionals need to ask themselves is: “How can I use my position to help create a literary world that is diverse, equitable, and doesn’t just represent the same segment of society it always has since its inception? What concrete actions can I take to make actual change and move beyond the tired conversation we’ve been having for decades?”

Diversity is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing

"The publishing industry looks a lot like these best-selling teenage dystopias: white and full of people destroying each other to survive."

via BuzzFeed Books

(via tubooks)

Filed under diversity diversity in publishing children's books publishing industry representation

3 notes

It’s almost Día de los niños/día de los libros, one of our favorite days of the year. Día celebrates reading among all children, in every language, and reminds all of us that no matter what language you speak at home, literacy can be a part of your life.
A few links to help you get ready:
Four Books to Celebrate El Día de los niños
10 Best Strategies for Reading to Kids in Spanish
English/Spanish recommended book list
English/Chinese recommended book list
More information about Día and listings of Día celebrations by location
Happy almost-Día!

It’s almost Día de los niños/día de los libros, one of our favorite days of the year. Día celebrates reading among all children, in every language, and reminds all of us that no matter what language you speak at home, literacy can be a part of your life.

A few links to help you get ready:

Four Books to Celebrate El Día de los niños

10 Best Strategies for Reading to Kids in Spanish

English/Spanish recommended book list

English/Chinese recommended book list

More information about Día and listings of Día celebrations by location

Happy almost-Día!

Filed under kidlit Bilingual Books dia de los ninos reading children's books

395 notes

A police officer from West Hartford had pulled up across the street, exited his vehicle, and begun walking in my direction. I noted the strangeness of his being in Hartford—an entirely separate town with its own police force—so I thought he needed help. He approached me with purpose, and then, without any introduction or explanation he asked, “So, you trying to make a few extra bucks, shoveling people’s driveways around here?”

All of my homeowner confidence suddenly seemed like an illusion.

It would have been all too easy to play the “Do you know who I am?” game. My late father was an immigrant from Trinidad who enrolled at Howard University at age 31 and went on to become a psychiatrist. My mother was an important education reformer from the South. I graduated from an Ivy League school with an engineering degree, only to get selected in the first round of the Major League Baseball draft. I went on to play professionally for nearly 15 years, retiring into business then going on to write a book and a column for The New York Times. Today, I work at ESPN in another American dream job that lets me file my taxes under the description “baseball analyst.”

But I didn’t mention any of this to the officer. I tried to take his question at face value, explaining that the Old Tudor house behind me was my own. The more I talked, the more senseless it seemed that I was even answering the question. But I knew I wouldn’t be smiling anymore that day.

Excellent, excellent article by retired MLB player Doug Glanville on how he was racially profiled while shoveling snow out of his own driveway in Hartford, Connecticut. Worth the read.

Filed under racial profiling stop and frisk doug glanville chicago cubs race